Author: Filsan Darman

Aadamiga building a better future
Aadamiga building a better future

AADAMIGA

Table of Contents:

Executive Summary

Vision and Mission Statements

Background on Somalia

Background on Aadamiga

Objectives and Needs for Assistance: transparency & accountability,

Aadamiga historical timeline.

Organizational Profile

Mission:

Educating and Fostering hope for Somali children.

Goal:

Provide direct economic development assistance to needy Somali families. Provide internally displaced people (IDPs) with tools to become self-sufficient and self-reliant.

Aadamiga’s objective is to assist families to become self-sufficient and in the process regain their dignity and economic freedom.

Vision:

• To end the cycle of ignorance and poverty of Somalia, by educating and investing in children.

To build a Water Well and a school at the local village level in Somalia.

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(AFP) – Kenya on Wednesday agreed to suspend the closure of Dabaab refugee camp, the world’s largest, for six months after coming under fire over the fate of its 280,000 inhabitants, most of them Somalis.

The decision to push the deadline back to May 2017 comes just two weeks before the camp was scheduled to close and follows mounting concern that Somali refugees, some of whom have lived in the camp for 25 years, were being forced to return against their will.

Interior minister Joseph Nkaissery said the move also followed a request to delay dismantlement from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

“I wish to announce that the government has accepted the request to extend the deadline for the completion of the repatriation of Somali refugees and the eventual closure of Dadaab refugee complex by six months,” he told a news conference.

Nkaissery said a comprehensive repatriation programme would be rolled out next month at the sprawling camp, home to Somali refugees since the outbreak of civil war in 1991.

“The repatriation will continue to be carried out in a humane, safe and dignified manner,” he said.
The government announced in May that the vast Dadaab camp in north-east Kenya near the Somali border would be shut down, citing security concerns.

Since sending troops into neighbouring Somalia in 2011, Kenya has come under repeated attack from Shabaab, East Africa’s long-time branch of Al-Qaeda.

‘Forcible returns are illegal’

Nairobi has taken a hardline position, claiming Dadaab acts as a terrorist training ground for Shabaab Islamists and that both the 2013 attack against Nairobi’s Westgate shopping mall and the 2015 attack at Garissa university were planned at Dabaab.

On Wednesday, Nkaissery pledged to abide by international law during the six-month resettlement of refugees to Somalia or to a third country while sticking to plans to close the camp.

“Delaying the closure of the camp by six months is certainly better than deporting the refugees in two weeks. But with the new date… the refugees will continue to feel that they must leave,” said Gerry Simpson, a researcher at rights group Human Rights Watch (HRW).

“Such coerced returns are illegal. Kenya should end its threats to close the Dadaab camps and the UN refugee agency and donors should press Kenya to publicly reassure Somalia refugees they are welcome in Kenya until it safe for them to return.”

In September, HRW warned in a report that the repatriation of Somalis from the sprawling Dadaab camp violated international standards and that refugees were returning home involuntarily only to face persecution and hunger.

The Kenyan government dismissed the report.

Refugees will be returning to a country that already has over one million people displaced from their homes, where five million lack enough food and where African and Somali forces are still fighting Al-Qaeda-aligned Shabaab militants.

An estimated 18,000 have returned this year — 10,000 since the announcement of the camp’s closure.

Amnesty International said that a verification exercise carried out by the Kenyan government and UNHCR in July and August had concluded that only 25 percent of refugees were willing to return.

Refugees said the authorities had threatened they would be forced to leave if they did not go and would miss out on a UNHCR repatriation allowance if they refused to leave, Amnesty said.dadaab

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AADAMIGA USA

Table of Contents:

Executive Summary

Vision and Mission Statements

Our Philosophy

Background on Somalia

Background on Aadamiga

Objectives and Needs for Assistance: transparency & accountability,

Aadamiga historical timeline.

Organizational Profile

Mission:

Educating and Fostering hope for Somali children.

Goal:

Provide direct economic development assistance to needy Somali families. Provide internally displaced people (IDPs) with tools to become self-sufficient and self-reliant.

Aadamiga’s objective is to assist families to become self-sufficient and in the process regain their dignity and economic freedom.

Vision:

• To end the cycle of ignorance and poverty of Somalia, by educating and investing in children.

To build a Water Well and a school at the local village level in Somalia.

Our PHILOSOPHY

Aadamiga adheres to the highest standards of ethical behavior in all operations and seeks to build and maintain public trust in the performance of programs. Aadamiga understands that this world is unpredictable and that it is important that our objectives are flexible and negotiable. Our objectives should not be vague or general we must be extremely precise and detailed, but we must also convey the idea that, throughout the development of the project, we will constantly engage with set objectives to make necessary changes and ratification when appropriate.

Aadamiga will engage in a strategic planning process every 3 to 5 years to review the mission and funding priorities and policies. People change, communities change, needs change.

Educate the community regarding the value, feasibility, and limits of engaging in public policy. Forge close working relationships with policymakers and follow their decision-making process. Facilitate collaboration among members, nonprofits, public officials, and other sector partners. Monitor issues affecting our programs and mission.

Aadamiga is committed to a periodic review of mission, funding priorities, policies and practices that will allow funders to better understand where we have been, what the needs are now and how to chart Aadamiga’s course moving forward to assure ongoing relevance, effectiveness and impact of all projects.

Determined to be flexible enough to accommodate those changes and be in-line with the current needs of the communities served.

transparency, accountability, and adhere to the highest standard of ethical and responsibility operations both internally and externally.

Maintain In all operations seek to build and maintain public trust in the performance of programs, and adhere to the highest standards of ethical behavior.

Generate internal operating policies that specify organization values regarding ethics and stewardship to which all staff, board and executive leadership must adhere. Review these policies periodically and revise them as necessary and make these policies accessible to the public through annual reports or upon request.

Aadamiga’s program and projects will be built on achievable realistic and clear objectives that can be fulfilled.

Background on Somalia

Mogadishu and other parts of Somalia are still unstable due to fighting between insurgent groups and government forces. The populations in parts of southern Somalia are among the most vulnerable in the world, due to the prolonged political instability, exacerbated by intermittent droughts.

Due to the absence of a central government, absence of humanitarian agencies, and inaccessibility of interior regions the humanitarian assistance is inadequate and as a result the majority of the population lacks education and health facilities and clean water.

A lot has changed since the drought ended. Violence has gone down dramatically, a new Somali government is in place, and many are hopeful for a better future. Now is a time to re-build the country – beginning with basic needs. Aadamiga has been able to expand into new activities since the conflict subsided.

Background on Aadamiga:

Aadamiga was established and registered in 1987 as a non-profit organization in Mogadishu, Somalia. The organizations initial objective was to advocate for basic human rights and the empowerment of Somali woman through skills training and entrepreneurship. It was appropriately named Aadamiga, the Somali word for ‘humanitarian’ as we believed in engaging collaborative ideas and efforts for the progress of humanity.

In 1988, our pilot project focused on woman entrepreneurs and in micro-finance in Mogadishu. Aadamiga provided small credit loans, specifically, targeting women entrepreneurs to facilitate the creation and expansion of their small businesses. This project, and other capacity building projects were funded and implemented in partnership with Oxfam USA, NOVIB, CIDA and the African Development Foundation.

At the start of the civil war in 1988, Aadamiga assisted IDPs that fled northern Somalia where the central government was particularly brutal in clamping down political and armed rebellion. In 1991, after the overthrow of the Somali government, Aadamiga was tasked with humanitarian assistance to IDPs in Mogadishu facilitating food aid distribution. The political instability in the city became too risky for Aadamiga to function, at which point activities were suspended and many staff left the country for safe havens.

Over the years, the challenges and positive impacts of the implemented projects called for restructuring Aadamiga’s efforts towards community-based approaches to improve basic education, increase access to clean water and expand economic opportunity. Today, Aadamiga is a humanitarian and development agency with a global perspective focused on ensuring Somali Women, Youth and Communities thrive post-conflict, are better prepared for crisis management and natural disaster recovery through equipping them with the right skills and capabilities to leverage the local and abundant resources.

In 2002, Aadamiga re-established itself from a base in the Washington DC area, in the United States, attaining a 501(c)(3) Non Profit status. The NGO then began working with the newly arrived Somali refugee community in Washington DC metropolitan area conducting workshops and providing counseling for the transition to life in the US, domestic violence prevention, mental health awareness, as well as cultural preservation and cultural orientation.

In 2006, the situation in Somalia deteriorated rapidly when foreign intervention in Mogadishu saw the largest displacement of the city’s residence to Afgoye with limited humanitarian access. Aadamiga revamped its activities in the city through raising funds from Somali Diaspora to provide clean water to IDPs in Afgoye, outside of Mogadishu. Aadamiga received donation from Mogadishu Businesses and Somali Diaspora and worked to provide critically needed clean water to the IDP camps. Eventually, as the humanitarian access corridor opened, International NGO’s arrived and helped to relieve some of the water and food scarcity issues.  In the US, the organization worked with the Somali Diaspora community to raise awareness about the plight of the civilians, and to protest failing policies by the various actors in the conflict.

Aadamiga was approached March 2010 by the elders of Arbow Yaroow, a village about 25 miles from Buulo Mareer in Lower Shabelle Region, and the elders offered to donate a large plot of land to Aadamiga for the construction of the projects. They requested Aadamiga to build a school, mosque, clinic and water well on the land they donated. At that time the village of 900 families did not have any of these valued structures. The elders said that the main health problem that they have is Malaria and “kaadi Dhiig” which means a disease that brings blood in the urine. The Elders also asked help with their farms. They said that the flooding is hindering them from working on their farms. They asked for assistance with opening a canal from the river and getting them farming tools so that they could go back to farming again. They also asked for assistance with the flooding that cuts their road from the main town of Buulo Mareer. Aadamiga informed the Elders that it will try to assist in whatever way possible but it said that for the time being Aadamiga will try to assist with building the school, Mosque and water well.

The Somali Community in the Washington DC Area helped with the construction of the first part of the Arbow Yaroow School, and it was opened on November 6, 2010. Free education was provided to some primary school students. The school opened with 48 girls and 72 boys, and hopes to expand in the future because we have more than 300 students, between the ages of 7 to 13, on the waiting list. Aadamiga provided free breakfast to all of the students because malnutrition is a problem in the region, and a child with an empty stomach cannot learn. The costs associated with the school include the cost of the physical structure, its maintenance, as well as the cost of personnel, including three teachers and one cook. Aadamiga was looking for funding to add five more classrooms and five additional teachers to be able to allow more students the opportunity for an education when the famine happened. Next year, Aadamiga plans to reopen the Arbow Yaroow School, as well as provide seeds to farmers, job training, and clean water projects to the farmers, if security allows. Aadamiga hopes to expand and add five new classrooms to the school and build the village water well deeper. The aim is for the village to be self-sufficient in three years. Aadamiga’s biggest challenge in the village was to convince the parents of the importance of educating the children. The villagers were convinced that it was more important for their children to look after the family’s cows and goats than going to school. Aadamiga School had to be closed because of the famine. Aadamiga plans to reopen the school 2017.

In January 2011, the famine in Somalia increased especially in the Lower Shabeele. Civil instability and draughts have exacerbated the struggles of the populations, exerting greater pressure on the limited food, water and other resources. The drought got worse and the livestock started to die. Aadamiga had to close the Arbow Yarow School because of the famine most families begun to flee the area.  The villagers looked to the Aadamiga to provide food for the entire village of over 900 families. Aadamiga found out about the famine early on when the livestock of the families of the school started to die. Aadamiga actively responded by opening a feeding center for locals and IDPs that travelled through the region, often en route to Mogadishu and Kenya. The feeding center supported 79 families with a daily meal until it was closed on September 30, 2011 when the dry food distribution was resumed.

Aadamiga began doing additional fundraising to provide food and distribute uncooked Beans, Sorghum, sesame seeds, Sugar, oil etc. for the village. Then in May 2011 the drought became more severe and hundreds of people from neighboring villages stopped at the Aadamiga Feeding center in Arboow Yaroow but we had to tell many of them to continue walking because we could not keep them there as Aadamiga did not have enough resources to feed thousands of people. At the height of the drought our feeding center fed 1500 people daily. Aadamiga sustained the feeding center and school in Arbow Yaarow completely through donations from the Somali-American communities in Ohio and Washington DC area. The UN on July 1, 2011 called the Somali drought, the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. Aadamiga’s impact was small but meaningful.

In the future, Aadamiga will continue to run the Arbow Yaroow School, as well as provide seeds to farmers, job training, and clean water projects. Aadamiga hopes to expand and add five new classrooms to the school and build the village water well deeper. Aadamigas aim is for the village to be self-sufficient in three years.

On February 2010, we recognized the at-risk youth, specifically street children around K4, to be worth a challenge taking on.  Aadamiga partnered with Amoud Foundation (US), and Kerdro Creek (Somalia) to provide a secure shelter for these children to call home and find hope to rebuild their future. However, many of the children need psychological assistance and medical attention to deal with drug and substance abuse. These children were over the years exposed to sniffing glue, alcohol, khaat, and other drugs. Many are homeless and live off the streets from younger ages with minimal family connections. Others were child soldiers/militias who have been traumatized and have physically engaged in abuses and cannot integrate back to the family and community life. Aadamiga is working on creating a program and secure funds to support the rehabilitation of this at-risk youth in a healthy environment. Sadly on 2012 the government took over the land that the shelter was on and destroyed it. Aadamiga hopes to build another shelter near the Aadamiga Academy located at the Ceelasha Biyaha, between Mogadishu and Afgoye.

On October 21, 2012 Aadamiga opened its first academy school in Mogadishu. The school is located in an IDP camp in the Hodan area, and has 40 female students and 40 male students taught by 4 teachers. Aadamiga was forced to close that school because of lack of funding. Aadamiga is scheduled to reopen that school on 2017.

Elders in several towns have donated plots of land to Aadamiga in order to build a school and water well, these include; Galkayo, Buulo Mareer, Mareer Gur and Beled Weyne. The organization plans to work in these towns and assist them with education access and clean water projects. Our ultimate goal as Aadamiga is to build an elementary school, and water well in every village in Somalia.

Aadamiga philosophy

Aadamiga believes that all people have the right to succeed, not just exist.  Our organization brings together and works with international, national and local partners that can bring about sustainable change and strengthening the capacity for self-reliance.  Aadamiga embraces collaborating with local communities to develop and implement programs. Our philosophy entails incorporating the following in our work:

Transparency to our donors and recipients

Collaboration with other Non Governmental Organizations

Commitment to Accountability

Community involvement and commitment

Mutual Respect

We value the inputs of the communities we serve as our tasks and past works have largely been created around immediate community needs. Our community-based approach to establishing programs can be summarized through the following process steps:

Request and communication from community of their needs

Eligibility screening and evaluation assessment

Intake- communicate policies and procedures with recipient community

Customized work plan and program activities.

Aadamiga’s Timeline:

1987- Aadamiga founded in Mogadishu.

1988- Women entrepreneur and Small Business Micro finance Project, Mogadishu.

1989- IDP shelter and food distribution, Mogadishu.

2002- Aadamiga re-established in Washington DC, registered as non-profit organization.

2006- Afgoye IDP water project.

2010- At-risk youth and Street Children program, Mogadishu

2010- Constructed and opened school in Lower Shabelle, Arbow Yaroow Somalia.

2011- IDP food and water distribution centers in Lower Shabelle Region, Buulo Mareer, Somalia

2012- Aadamiga Academy at Hodan IDP camp, Mogadishu.

2016- Aadamiga Academy opened at Ceelasha Biyaha, Afgoye.

2017- Open a Mother and Child Health Clinic at the Ceelasha Biyaha.

2017- Reopen the Arbow Yaroow School depending on security in the area.

2018-Rebuild the Shelter for the Street Children at the Ceelasha Biyaha.

2018-Reopen the Hodan Aadamiga Academy at the Hodan IDP Camp.

 

2018- Start the construction of the Boarding School at the Ceelasha Biyaha.

2017- Beyond:

Clean Water Projects

Public School rehabilitation/ Education programs

Livelihood programs

Health Projects

Attachments: Aadamiga in the news, partner links, fundraising events, project portfolio,

www.aadamiga.org

aadamiga@aadamiga.org

 

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